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Being an effective manager Learning resource

Chapters

Appendices

Disability Services Standards

Standards Key performance indicators
1 Service access

Each person with disability who is seeking a service has access to a service on the basis of relative need and available resources.
The service provider adopts and applies non-discriminatory entry rules in respect of age, gender, race, culture, religion or disability, consistent with the contractual obligations of the service provider and the purpose of the service.
The service provider’s entry and exit procedures are fair and equitable and consistently applied.
2 Individual needs

Each person with disability receives a service that is designed to meet, in the least restrictive way, his or her individual needs and personal goals.
Each individual’s employment goals are established objectively to reflect his or her needs and personal goals.
Each individual’s employment goals are used as a basis for service provision, with the service provider undertaking a process of planning, implementation, review and adjustment to facilitate the achievement of these goals.
Services are delivered to meet each individual’s employment goals through pathways and plans that do not have any unnecessary restrictions or constraints.
3 Decision making and choice

Each person with disability has the opportunity to participate as fully as possible in making decisions about the events and activities of his or her daily life in relation to the service he or she receives.
The service provider provides appropriate and flexible opportunities for each individual to participate in decision-making at all levels, including individual choices in pre-employment and employment planning, service delivery planning and corporate and business planning.
The service provider acts upon the outcomes of service recipient input into decision-making.
4 Privacy, dignity and confidentiality

Each service recipient’s right to privacy, dignity and confidentiality in all aspects of his or her life is recognised and respected.
The service provider complies with the Information Privacy Principles of the Privacy Act 1988 in order to protect and respect the rights of individual service recipients. The service provider does not disclose personal information about service recipients without their informed consent.
The service provider promotes tolerance and respect for each service recipient’s personal needs and circumstances.
5 Participation and integration

Each person with disability is supported and encouraged to participate and be involved in the community.
The service contributes to individual outcomes for service recipients that progressively builds opportunities for their participation and involvement in the community through employment.
6 Valued status

Each person with disability has the opportunity to develop and maintain skills and to participate in activities that enable him or her to achieve valued roles in the community.
The service promotes the belief and ability of service recipients to fulfil valued roles in the community.
The service promotes employment opportunities for service recipients to fulfil valued roles in the community.
The service develops and maintains service recipients’ skills relevant to their roles in the community.
7 Complaints and disputes

Each service recipient is encouraged to raise, and have resolved without fear of retribution, any complaints or disputes he or she may have regarding the service provider or the service.
The service provider encourages the raising of complaints by service recipients regarding any areas of dissatisfaction with the service provider and the service.
Service recipients have no fear of retribution in raising complaints.
The service provider facilitates the resolution of complaints or disputes by service recipients regarding the service provider and the service.
8 Service management

Each service provider adopts quality management systems and practices that optimise outcomes for service recipients.
The service provider has management systems in place that facilitate quality management practices and continuous improvement.
9 Employment conditions

Each person with disability enjoys working conditions comparable to those of the general workforce.
The service provider ensures that people with disability, placed in open or supported employment, receive wages according to the relevant Australian Pay and Classification Scale (APCS), Special Federal Minimum Wage (SFMW), award, order or industrial agreement (if any). A wage must not have been reduced, or be reduced, because of award exemptions or incapacity to pay or similar reasons and, if a person is unable to work at full productive capacity due to disability, the service provider is to ensure that a pro-rata wage based on the applicable special SFMW, APCS, award, order or industrial agreement is paid. This pro-rata wage must be determined through a transparent assessment tool or process, such as Supported Wage System (SWS), or tools that comply with the criteria referred to in the Guide to Good Practice Wage Determination including:
  • compliance with relevant legislation
  • validity
  • reliability
  • wage outcome
  • practical application of the tool.
The service provider ensures that, when people with disability are placed in employment, their conditions of employment are consistent with general workplace norms and relevant Commonwealth and State legislation.
The service provider ensures that, when people with disability are placed and supported in employment, they, and if appropriate, their guardians and advocates, are informed of how wages and conditions are determined and the consequences of this.
10 Service recipient training and support

The employment opportunities of each person with disability are optimised by effective and relevant training and support.
The service provider provides or facilitates access to relevant training and support programs that are consistent with the employment goals and opportunities of each service recipient.
11 Staff recruitment, employment and training

Each person employed to deliver services to a person with disability has relevant skills and competencies.
The service provider identifies the skills and competencies of each staff member.
The service provider ensures that its staff have relevant skills and competencies.
The service provider ensures the provision of appropriate and relevant training and skills development for each staff member.
12 Protection of human rights and freedom from abuse

The service provider acts to prevent abuse and neglect and to uphold the legal and human rights of service recipients.
The service provider takes all practical and appropriate steps to prevent abuse and neglect of its service recipients.
The service provider upholds the legal and human rights of its service recipients.

Reference

Adapted from Stone, RJ 2002, Human resource management, 4th edn, John Wiley, Australia.

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, viewed 1 February 2008, adapted from www.facsia.gov.au/guides_acts/ssg/ssguide-1.3.

Cole, K 2002, The supervisor's survival guide – A practical guide to successful supervision, Pearson Education, Australia.

Hybels, S & Weaver II, RL 2006, Communicating effectively, 6th edn, McGraw Hill, Australia.

Scope UK 2007, Challenging behaviour and cerebral palsy, viewed 19 January 2008, www.scope.org.uk.

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