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When I'm at work: Solving complaints - Learner's workbook

Chapters

Topic 2



What you will need

You will need:

You're ready so let's start ...

Watch the first three slides and listen carefully. They will tell you what this topic is about.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Complaints can make things better

You have the right to make complaints. Your workplace must try to sort them out quickly for you.

It is important to fix something if it is wrong. That is one way things improve and become better. That is why you need to let someone know about the problems you have.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Disability Services Standards

The Australian Government has rules for Disability Employment Services.

These rules are called the Disability Services Standards.

Standard 7

Standard 7 is about what your workplace must do if you make a complaint. Your workplace has to give you information about how you can make a complaint, and what happens if you do. Your supervisor will talk with you about this information.

Disability Services Standard 7 says that if you make a complaint, your workplace should:

Disability Services Standard 7 also says that your workplace must keep your complaint private. This means that if you make a complaint, your workplace cannot tell anyone else that you are the person who has made it.

Standard 4

Standard 4 says that your workplace must respect your privacy and confidentiality, and that includes when you make a complaint.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Your right to complain

You have a right to complain and also to know how your workplace must deal with your complaint.

It is your right to know:

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Do not be afraid to complain

Remember that:

Dianne's story

Now watch and listen carefully to Dianne's story.

This is Dianne, a supported employee.

And this is Lenny, the manager of the cafeteria at Dianne's workplace.

At Dianne's workplace, employees order their lunches from the workplace cafeteria. A staff member collects the orders each day and hands them out to the employees at lunchtime.

Dianne orders the same meal each day – sausages, gravy and chips but by the time she receives it, at least half an hour has passed, and the food has become cold and is not very appetising.

Dianne wants to complain to Lenny about her cold food but she's a bit afraid to because she doesn't want to make a fuss. What if Lenny is angry with her for complaining? What if she loses her job because of it?

After talking to her supervisor about it, Dianne decides to speak with Lenny. He listens carefully to Dianne's complaint, and explains that the problem is the time delay between the food being cooked and Dianne receiving it. He is glad that Dianne spoke with him about this, as he didn't know the food was cold.

Lenny says that, from now on, he will keep the lunches warm until they are collected, so that they will still be hot when Dianne and her co-workers receive them.

Dianne is happy to hear this. The next day, her lunchbox is nice and warm when she receives it, so she knows that the food inside will be nice and warm too.

Workbook activities

What did you learn from Dianne's story?

Your trainer will talk with you about what you learned. You might want to write down some of the things you learned. The trainer will help you if you are not sure what to do.

1. How can a complaint make things better at work?

2. What are some of your rights if you want to make a complaint?

3. What are some of the things that your workplace has to do for you if you want to make a complaint?

4. What did you learn from Dianne's story?

5. What would you do if this happened to you?

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