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When I'm at work: Solving complaints - Learner's workbook

Chapters

Topic 1



What you will need

You will need:

You're ready so let's start ...

Watch the first three slides and listen carefully. They will tell you what this topic is about.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

What is a complaint?

A complaint is when you have a problem or worry about your work that you need to tell someone about.

Something or someone could be making you feel unsafe, uncomfortable, or unhappy at work. This might make it hard for you to do your job. When this happens, you need to do something about it. You need to get help to sort it out.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Different types of complaints

Things that might lead to a complaint at work are:

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

Is your complaint serious or just a grumble?

We all grumble about things at work now and then, but we may not need to make formal complaints about them all. Talking to a friend or co-worker who you trust can help you decide this.

There is a difference between problems that you need to make a formal complaint about and the 'grumbles' we sometimes have about work.

Example of a workplace grumble

Your workplace gives all its supported employees freshly-baked scones for morning tea every Friday. You might grumble about not getting a morning tea like that every day, but this is not a problem that you would make a formal complaint about.

Example of a serious complaint

You bring money to work every day so that you can buy your lunch. Twice last week, someone took the money from your locker. This is a serious problem and you should make a formal complaint about that.

How can you tell the difference between a grumble and a complaint?

Asking yourself these questions might help.

Watch the next slide and listen carefully. The words you see on the slide are a summary of the words you hear. The words you hear are printed below.

When should you make a complaint?

You should make a complaint when you have a problem or worry at work that you cannot work out on your own.

When you first start work, part of your induction explains how to make a complaint if you have a problem.

The Australian Government has rules called Disability Services Standards that tell your workplace how to do things. Standard 7 is one of these rules. It says that your workplace must help you to get something done about your complaint, if it is related to work.

We will talk more about Disability Services Standards in other topics.

Igor's story

Now watch and listen carefully to Igor's story.

This is Igor, a supported employee.

This is his manager, Theresa.

And this is Clive, another supported employee who works with Igor.

Igor goes to Theresa to make a complaint about Clive.

Clive always asks Igor the same questions, 'How are you going, Igor?' and 'Have you seen Brian O'Keefe?'. These questions are OK, but Clive asks them up to 20 times a day, whenever Igor goes anywhere near him. Clive does this with most people.

Clive's behaviour is really starting to annoy Igor. He tries hard to be nice to Clive, but it is not easy sometimes.

For a long time, people have asked Clive to stop asking these questions, but nothing seems to work for long.

Lots of people have complained about Clive's behaviour in the past. The workplace counsellor has talked to Clive about his behaviour, and even that has not helped the problem.

Igor tells Theresa that he is feeling very stressed because of Clive's behaviour. Igor asks Theresa to help him with getting something done about his complaint.

Workbook activities

What did you learn from Igor's story?

Your trainer will talk with you about what you learned. You might want to write down some of the things you learned. The trainer will help you if you are not sure what to do.

1. What does Disability Services Standard 7 tell you about?

2. Does your workplace have to listen to you?

3. Does your workplace have to try to fix your problem?

4. Would you make a formal complaint about a work problem if:

5. What did you learn from Igor's story?

6. What would you do if this happened to you?

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